14 Jun 2019

EURO 2019 Conference

The 30th European Conference on operational research is taking place on 23 – 26 June 2019 in Dublin, Ireland, and Rehap will be in providing an oral presentation.

The Scientific and Organisation Committees, chaired by Luis Gouveia and Seán McGarraghy, along with Cathal MacSwiney Brugha, have prepared a high quality scientific program and an exciting social program for the conference.

At the conference, Rehap will be presenting during the Sustainable Supply Chains, Session WD22 – Energy Management, on Wednesday at 14:30 to 16:00.

The presentation will look in detail at the, Environmental benefits of a second-generation bioethanol production network designed by integrating Life Cycle Assessment and supply chain network optimisation.

For more information on what Rehap will be presenting, contact: amelia@ipl.eu.com

The full extensive online programme can be found on the website here.

03 Jun 2019

New poster on upscaling processes

TECNALIA and BBEPP are involved in developing an industrial scalable process to obtain lignin for further transformation into high value products. TECNALIA performed a mild extraction to dissolve lignin and further precipitated with sulfuric acid, whilst BBEPP scaled up this method.

To present this development a poster has been created titled: Lignin purification from poplar hydrolysis: From laboratory tests to pilot scale.

Click on the image below to see the complete poster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are working on the Rehap project and would like a poster designed, please get in contact with Amelia at amelia@ipl.eu.com.

28 May 2019

Webinar highlights Rehap’s progress in biomass feedstock and valorisation

Responding to the ambitious targets set in the EU’s Europe 2020 strategy of sustainable patterns of consumption and production, Rehap is an EU-funded project facilitating a significant step towards a better use of natural resources by creating novel materials from agricultural and forestry waste, whilst decreasing the use of fossil resources and energy in the process industry.

The project recently held its first webinar, Biomass feedstock and valorisation: An introduction and insight into transforming agroforestry waste into high added-value commercial and sustainable products developed by the REHAP project. The webinar took a close look at the progress being made after two years’ working on biomass feedstock and valorisation.

Aitor Barrio, Rehap project coordinator from TECNALIA led the webinar providing a streamlined detailed overview of the technical objectives of Rehap and how it will demonstrate turning waste into reliable and sustainable applications later to be demonstrated as a prototype structure.

To provide a picture of the processes and regulations in sourcing this agroforestry waste material, Lars Wietschel from the University of Augsburg the state-of-the-art agroforestry residues and the forecasting results of their 2030 waste potentials.

Discussing the optimisation of these biomass waste stream processing and upscaling, Tarja Tamminen, researcher at VTT, explained the novel approach developed to utilise bark by soda/kraft cooking away from the hot water bark extraction traditionally used in the industry.

Andrea Leoncini from RINA Consulting followed by providing a comprehensive look at the project’s market analysis and impact through the life cycle approach. This provided an extremely interesting picture of how Rehap is hoping to sustainability develop and implement these processes for a greener building sector.

During the webinar poll questions were asked to the audience of professionals in companies and institutions such as the pulp and paper industry, biorefineries, forest proprietaries, sawmills and those in the chemical industries or phenolic resin manufacturing for example. Interesting data was revealed on how they saw the progress and wide-scale adoption across Europe in the uptake of bio-based products over their fossil-based equivalents.

These questions, and the results, along with the webinar on demand, can be found here!

This is the first in a series of Rehap webinars. Sign up to the newsletter to be the first to hear about the second edition.

For any questions regarding the webinar on the project, please contact Amelia: amelia@ipl.eu.com

15 May 2019

Webinar Rescheduled

Webinar - Rescheduled

Biomass feedstock and valorisation
An introduction and insight into transforming agroforestry waste into high
added-value commercial and sustainable products developed by the REHAP project

20 May 2019 – Watch live and on demand. Register today!

Responding to the ambitious targets set in the EU’s Europe 2020 strategy of sustainable patterns of consumption and production, REHAP is an EU-funded project facilitating a significant step towards a better use of natural resources by creating novel materials from agricultural and forestry waste, whilst decreasing the use of fossil resources and energy in the process industry.

The project’s first webinar takes a close look at the progress being made after two years’ work in creating these novel materials from agriculture and forestry waste for commercial use in the green construction sector. Expert project partners from the University of Augsburg, Tecnalia, VTT Research Centre and Rina Consulting will be leading discussions on the following topics:

  • An introduction to REHAP and the project’s main objectives.
  • Waste management – forecasting of feedstock potentials in the EU.
  • Optimisation of biomass waste stream processing and upscaling.
  • Market analysis and life cycle assessment (LCA) of REHAP processes.

The webinar will divulge on-going project results to provide a picture of the processes the project is developing and using to produce and up-scale waste material into pilot scale eco-friendly products and demonstrate their sustainability and business potential compared to existing solutions.

Get involved and speak out

During the webinar you will have the opportunity to submit any questions you may have to the speakers, which will be answered live during the designated Q&A session at the end of the webinar.

Who should attend?

This webinar will interest professionals in companies and institutions that are related to the production of low-value residues such as bark, wheat straw and sawmill. This might include the pulp and paper industry, biorefineries, forest proprietaries, sawmills, farmers and forest associations, amongst others.

Also, those in the chemical industries of the likes of phenolic resin manufacturing, polyurethane industries and adhesive manufacturing could be interesting to know about new biosources for their raw materials.

Registering for the webinar will also allow you to become part of a growing network of key actors in the biomass and bioeconomy space in Europe, taking part in discussions and learning lessons about this important sector as it quickly develops.

Join us at the webinar to learn how REHAP is strengthening the bioeconomy. Register here!

This webinar was rescheduled from 8 May due to technical issues.

10 May 2019

Commission calls for bioeconomy strategies to be expanded and implemented

Under the future Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), the European Commission will not approve the national strategic plan of a member state that does not include the promotion of the bioeconomy in agriculture, the EU’s farming Commissioner Phil Hogan said on Thursday (25 April).

“The bioeconomy is a very important subject that requires EU-wide action and it is now stating explicitly as part of the 9 EU objectives” of the reformed CAP, Hogan said.

The EU Commissioner for agriculture and rural development was answering a question from EURACTIV.com at the conference Our Forest, Our Future in Brussels last Friday (26 April).

Through national strategic plans laid down in the proposed CAP, all member states will outline how they want to meet these 9 EU-wide objectives, including the promotion of the bioeconomy, using the CAP tools.

Hogan pointed out that EU countries are required to submit proposals on how to expand the bioeconomy’s role in agriculture and in all bio-based industries.

According to the EU’s agriculture boss, EU member states will have more freedom under the Commission’s proposal for the future CAP. This freedom will allow them to focus on their bioeconomies and help them meet the higher ambitions of the future policy on the environment and climate change.

“A sustainable bioeconomy is also hugely important for reducing emissions in the EU,” said Hogan, mentioning bioenergy’s contribution to help meeting renewable energy targets for 2020 and 2030, but also to substitute fossil-based materials in sectors like construction, plastics or textiles.

EU and national strategies

The Commission’s bioeconomy strategy was initially conceived seven years ago as a way to encourage Europe to be less dependent on petroleum. The updated strategy presented last October expanded its action plan to develop a sustainable and circular bioeconomy from mainly biofuels to any kind of bio-based industry.

Now the strategy looks more at the circular economy as well as sustainability. The three goals of the strategy, as stated by the Commission, are to strengthen and scale up the bio-based sectors, unlock investments and markets, deploy local bioeconomies rapidly across the whole of Europe and understand the ecological boundaries of the bioeconomy.

The Commission’s action plan also promotes the uptake of national bioeconomy strategies, setting up tools such as the European bioeconomy policy support facility, as well as a European Bioeconomy forum, in order to help EU countries develop their own strategy.

“We need a bioeconomy strategy that can be implemented in every member state,” Hogan said.

Currently, only Germany, France, Spain, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Finland and Malta have dedicated national bioeconomy strategies at the national level. Six EU countries have strategies under development while the remaining 13 have other policy initiatives or related strategies at a national level.

Additional income for farmers

“For the past 4 years at the EU level, I have put the bioeconomy centrally in the agricultural policy discussions of the future,” said Hogan.

According to Hogan, the European Parliament agrees that the bioeconomy can be a win-win for farmers and cooperatives when it comes to creating jobs in rural areas and  providing a new source of income for farmers.

However, the three reports that together form the entire CAP structure were approved only by the agriculture committee of the European Parliament, without reaching the plenary stage.

It means that it will be up to the Conference of Presidents of the next Parliament, after the EU elections in May, to decide whether to forward the draft report directly to the plenary or ask the next agriculture committee to start from scratch instead.

“We have tried our best to get member states and farmers focused on this for the future,” Hogan said. “And now, for the first time, I think we are succeeding.”

Hogan hopes member states will make their own initiatives and that the discussions with the Romanian presidency will be successful and help farmers and producers see the potential of the bioeconomy.

(Article sourced from: www.euractiv.com)

01 May 2019

April partner meeting round-up

The most recent partner meeting was hosted by RINA in Genova, Italy. Project partners came together to review the progress of actions set during the previous meeting in October and looked closely at results from specific studies in the valorisation of intermediates in high added-value products and preliminary LCA and LCC evaluations.

Dissemination partners, Insight Publishers commenced the meeting providing detail on the exploitation and communication of the on-going project developments and results. This included open discussions on the first Rehap webinar, a second workshop and the project’s place in IPL’s Projects Magazine on the energy efficiency industry.

RINA continued by explaining preliminary LCA and LCC studies on four main materials: Bio-PUR, wooden boards, green concrete and PU adhesives. A short LCA/LCC session was then held with partners to revise the value chains and set benchmarks of these materials.

The second day was opened by Lars Wietschel from UNIA who have published papers on feedstock price analysis and feedstock potential with another paper planned on further work on waste management.

Pieter Brabander from BBEPP elaborated on the lab trials for the planned upscaling of processes for the fermentation of 1,4-BDO and 2,3-BDO, before Rehap coordinator Aitor Barrio led detailed discussions with partners on the on-going research and developments in the valorisation of intermediates in the high added-value products. Partners were reminded to update the Risks table when completing their research.

To round off the meeting, Martin Mosquet introduced partners focused on the application of these products in the final construction elements (concrete, wooden panels, PU adhesives, insulation). LaFarage-Holcim, Foresa, Rampf and Collanti touched on their initial plans of this process for the next six months. In particular, the parameters for the tests that need to be done to develop these products.

The next meeting is proposed to take place in November, when the actions of the next six months will be reviewed. Location TBC.

For more information, please contact Aitor Barrio: aitor.barrio@tecnalia.com

26 Apr 2019

How to convert wheat straw waste into green chemicals

The development of new bio-refining technologies based on agricultural waste is seen as key to reducing Europe’s dependency on fossil-based products. According to a White Paper by the International Council on Clean Transportation, about 144 million tonnes of wheat residues accumulate each year in the EU. Supported by the EU-funded OPTISOCHEM project, researchers have made significant progress in transforming this excess material into something more useful: bio-isobutene, or bio-IBN, a key precursor for numerous chemicals.

The project involves several processes such as the conversion of wheat straw into hydrolysate and its fermentation into isobutene. This material is then converted into oligomers and polymers. A press release by project coordinator Global Bioenergies states that “currently underutilized residual wheat straw has been converted at demo scale into second generation renewable bio-isobutene, and will eventually be transformed into oligomers and polymers usable in lubricants, rubbers, cosmetics, solvents, plastics, or fuels applications.”

Planned activities

Quoted in the same press release, Jean-François Boideau, EMEA Commercial General Manager at project partner INEOS Oligomers, says: “To date, we received several batches of bio-isobutene from Global Bioenergies for qualification purpose[s], and the quality is promising. During the next phase of the project, INEOS is ready to evaluate conversion of additional quantities of bio-isobutene into downstream products in order to assess the potential of this bio-based feedstock as a building block for end consumer applications.” Frederic Pâques, COO of Global Bioenergies, adds: “We expect to produce several tons of bio-isobutene on this new non-conventional feedstock in the remaining periods of the project.”

Various benefits

The project website notes that the partners hope to make use of the “technical, economic as well as environmental/social sustainability performances” for a commercial biorefinery. The ongoing OPTISOCHEM (OPTimized conversion of residual wheat straw to bio-ISObutene for bio based CHEMicals) project is funded by the Bio-Based Industries Joint Undertaking (BBI JU), a public-private partnership between the EU and the Bio-based Industries Consortium. The project will run until May 2021.

As summarised on the BBI JU project web page, OPTISOCHEM aims to achieve a rise in “the yield of targeted bio-based product(s)” by over 20 % and lessen “production costs of bio-based products by 10-20%, compared to current market situation.” Another expected impact of the project involves “savings, in terms of CO2 emissions per kg product by more than 20% for bio-catalytic as compared to state-of-the-art production methods.” The partners also plan to cut “energy consumption by more than 30% for bio-catalytic processes.”

Overall, the BBI JU is expected to provide several environmental and socioeconomic benefits, as summarised on its website: “The new bio-based products resulting from the BBI JU will on average reduce CO2 emissions by at least 50% compared to their fossil alternatives.” It emphasises that these products will be “comparable and/or superior to fossil-based products in terms of price, performance, availability and environmental benefits.”

(Article sourced from: www.cordis.europa.eu/news/rcn/130991/en)

08 Apr 2019

Webinar: Biomass feedstock and valorisation

Webinar

Biomass feedstock and valorisation
An introduction and insight into transforming agroforestry waste into high
added-value commercial and sustainable products developed by the REHAP project

8 May 2019 – Watch live and on demand. Register today!

Responding to the ambitious targets set in the EU’s Europe 2020 strategy of sustainable patterns of consumption and production, REHAP is an EU-funded project facilitating a significant step towards a better use of natural resources by creating novel materials from agricultural and forestry waste, whilst decreasing the use of fossil resources and energy in the process industry.

The project’s first webinar takes a close look at the progress being made after two years’ work in creating these novel materials from agriculture and forestry waste for commercial use in the green construction sector. Expert project partners from the University of Augsburg, Tecnalia, VTT Research Centre and Rina Consulting will be leading discussions on the following topics:

  • An introduction to REHAP and the project’s main objectives.
  • Waste management – forecasting of feedstock potentials in the EU.
  • Optimisation of biomass waste stream processing and upscaling.
  • Market analysis and life cycle assessment (LCA) of REHAP processes.

The webinar will divulge on-going project results to provide a picture of the processes the project is developing and using to produce and up-scale waste material into pilot scale eco-friendly products and demonstrate their sustainability and business potential compared to existing solutions.

Get involved and speak out

During the webinar you will have the opportunity to submit any questions you may have to the speakers, which will be answered live during the designated Q&A session at the end of the webinar.

Who should attend?

This webinar will interest professionals in companies and institutions that are related to the production of low-value residues such as bark, wheat straw and sawmill. This might include the pulp and paper industry, biorefineries, forest proprietaries, sawmills, farmers and forest associations, amongst others.

Also, those in the chemical industries of the likes of phenolic resin manufacturing, polyurethane industries and adhesive manufacturing could be interesting to know about new biosources for their raw materials.

Registering for the webinar will also allow you to become part of a growing network of key actors in the biomass and bioeconomy space in Europe, taking part in discussions and learning lessons about this important sector as it quickly develops.

Join us at the webinar to learn how REHAP is strengthening the bioeconomy. Register here!

 

19 Mar 2019

Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants

With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable — but frustratingly untapped — bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous plastics.

Researchers, like those at the University of Wisconsin–Madison-based, Department of Energy-funded Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, hoping to turn woody plants into a replacement for petroleum in the production of fuels and other chemicals have been after the sugars in the fibrous cellulose that makes up much of the plants’ cell walls.

Much of the work of procuring those sugars involves stripping away lignin, a polymer that fills the gaps between cellulose and other chemical components in those cell walls.

That leaves a lot of useful cellulose, but also a lot of lignin — which has never carried much value. Paper mills have been stripping lignin from wood to make paper for more than a century, and finding so little value in the lignin that it’s simply burned in the mills’ boilers.

“They say you can make anything from lignin except money,” says Miguel Perez, a UW–Madison graduate student in civil and environmental engineering.

But they may not know Novosphingobium aromaticivorans as well as he does.

Perez, civil and environmental engineering professor Daniel Noguera and colleagues at GLBRC and the Wisconsin Energy Institute have published in the journal Green Chemistry a strategy for employing N. aromaticivorans to turn lignin into a more valuable commodity.

“Lignin is the most abundant source — other than petroleum — of aromatic compounds on the planet,” Noguera says, like those used to manufacture chemicals and plastics from petroleum. But the large and complex lignin molecule is notoriously hard to efficiently break into useful constituent pieces.

Enter the bacterium, which was first isolated while thriving in soil rich in aromatic compounds after contamination by petroleum products.

Where other microbes pick and choose, N. aromaticivoransis a biological funnel for the aromatics in lignin. It is unique in that it can digest nearly all of the different pieces of lignin into smaller aromatic hydrocarbons.

“Other microbes tried before may be able to digest a few types of aromatics found in lignin,” Perez says. “When we met this microbe, it was already good at degrading a wide range of compounds. That makes this microbe very promising.”

In the course of its digestion process, the microbe turns those aromatic compounds into 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylic acid — more manageably known as PDC. By removing three genes from their microbe, the researchers turned the intermediate PDC into the end of the line. These engineered bacteria became a funnel into which the different lignin pieces go, and out of which PDC flows.

Bioengineers in Japan have used PDC to make a variety of materials that would be useful for consumer products.

“They have found out the compound performs the same or better than the most common petroleum-based additive to PET polymers — like plastic bottles and synthetic fibers — which are the most common polymers being produced in the world,” Perez says.

Miguel Perez It would be an attractive plastic alternative — one that would break down naturally in the environment, and wouldn’t leach hormone-mimicking compounds into water — if only PDC were easier to come by.

“There’s no industrial process for doing that, because PDC is so difficult to make by existing routes,” says Noguera. “But if we’re making biofuels from cellulose and producing lignin — something we used to just burn — and we can efficiently turn the lignin into PDC, that potentially changes the market for industrial use of this compound.”

For now, the engineered variation on N. aromaticivorans can turn at least 59 percent of lignin’s potentially useful compounds into PDC. But the new study suggests greater potential, and Perez has targets for further manipulation of the microbe.

“If we can make this pipeline produce at a sufficient rate, with a sufficient yield, we might create a new industry,” Noguera says.

The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation has filed a patent application on this technology.

THIS RESEARCH WAS FUNDED BY GRANTS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (BER DE-FC02-07ER64494 AND DE-SC0018409) AND THE CHILEAN NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 

(Article sourced from: www.news.wisc.edu/engineered-microbe-may-be-key-to-producing-plastic-from-plants/)

14 Mar 2019

Design the penetration of Non-food Crops (NFC) into European agriculture: PANACEA Project

The Horizon 2020 PANACEA project aims to set up a thematic network to foster the effective exchange between research, industry and the farming community in order to design the penetration path of Non-food Crops (NFC) into European agriculture.

Non-food Crops (NFC) are used to produce a wide range of bio-products and bioenergy. In spite of considerable investment in R&D and the increasing need of bio-based industries for feedstock, NFCs are not widespread in EU agriculture. This is mainly due to challenges in supply chains and gaps in policy framework and investment incentives.

Aims of the project

PANACEA project aims to set up a thematic network to foster the effective exchange between research, industry and the farming community. In this way, direct applicable solutions will be widely disseminated as well as grassroots-level needs and innovative ideas will thoroughly captured in order to design the penetration path of NFC into European agriculture.

There are many objectives that PANACEA project is finalized at pursuing.

One of these is to create an inventory of long-term scientific results generated through R&I projects on the sustainable production of NFC as well as to identify those that are close to implementation in agricultural and forestry practice. Another one is to analyse the role that NFC can play in the renaissance of European rural areas taking into consideration the farmers’ and bio-based industries’ needs and interests.

To establish a strong and interactive multi-actor forum will be also fundamental, by involving a wide range of actors from science, industry and agricultural practice that will facilitate capturing and spreading innovative ideas.

At the same time, the PANACEA project will establish capacity building activities through substantial training courses and educational material with practice-oriented knowledge on specific value chains that will be easily accessible and available in the long term beyond the project period. Not only; the projects aims to develop, operate and maintain the PANACEA platform which will offer a range of services to key stakeholders and end-users on NFC, including: knowledge sharing, communication and networking, assessment of the economic and environmental aspects of NFC, and matching between the supply and demand sides.

The last PANACEA’s aim is to disseminate the project findings at large scale, following an extended exploitation and dissemination plan that will be active throughout the project and beyond. In the meanwhile, the project will ensure the sustainability of the Thematic Network on non-food crops through its link with EU wide initiatives, especially the EIP-AGRI and its Operational Groups.

PANACEA’s approach

For achieving its goal, PANACEA follows a multi-actor approach, including in the partnership researchers, agrimarket players, farmers’ organisations and other practitioners from different EU countries. In this way applied research and innovation results on a variety of NFC will flow across geographical areas in EU and reach the practitioners.

The work planned in the network follows interactive procedures, thus the applied knowledge and information already obtained by the practitioners is fed back to the researchers to enrich the relevant scientific research findings. It is recognised that the observed lack in market development for NFC is primarily the result of fragmented communication and slow exchange of science based evidence with day-to-day agricultural practices on the ground. Grassroots-level ideas, needs and success stories across EU will be analysed and extended to practitioners. Roadmaps mainstreaming NFC into European agriculture will be produced.

(Article sourced from: www.besustainablemagazine.com)

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